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ASL: Lesson 11:

Objectives:
___ Sentence Types
___ I know what "VP" stands for after a phone number. (Click for answer)
___ I know what the letters VRS, TDD, and/or TTY stand for.
___
I have taken the Lesson 11 Practice Quiz
___ I have taken the general practice quiz for this lesson.  See: PRACTICE QUIZZES

Vocabulary:
ABOUT
ALWAYS
ANY
BACK-[#BACK]
BUT / different
CALL-[phone, named, yell, tty-call]
CAN'T
FOR
GREAT-[wonderful]
LITTLE-[little-bit]
MAKE
NEVER
NEW
OH-I-SEE
OR
PEOPLE
SOMETIMES
TALK-[chat-with, talk-with]
THING

 

Review or clarify
Signs have versions:  Anxious: see NERVOUS / anxious (learn both versions).
Signs can have multiple meanings:  IF can mean "suppose." 
Signs often evolve and contract to advanced forms:  LOOK-LIKE

Signs can be inflected to take on new meanings:  FOR can be repeated and use furrowed eyebrows to mean "What for?"
TALK is a different sign from CHAT-with. They are both different from TALK-with. Click the link in the vocabulary list and put in the effort to learn the variations.

Sentences:
Practice Sheet: 11.A
01. TELL-me ABOUT YOUR TEACHER (Tell me about your teacher.)
02. YOU GO CLASS ON TIME ALWAYS? (Do you always go to class on time?)
03. YOU HAVE DOG AND CAT YOU? (Do you have a cat and a dog?)
04. YOUR FAMILY ANY DEAF? (Is anyone in your family deaf?)
05. CLASS FINISH, #BACK HOME YOU? (Are you going back home after class?)

Practice Sheet: 11.B
06. HOW YOU FEEL?
07. DEAF CAN CALL HEARING-[people] HOW?  (Use the Relay.)
08. YOU CAN'T UNDERSTAND HE/SHE TEACHER, WHY? (Why can't you understand the teacher?)
09. TAKE-UP ASL FOR-FOR? (Why are you taking ASL?)
10. BOOK YOU THINK WONDERFUL, NAME? (Name a book that you think is wonderful.)

Practice sheet 11.C
11. YOUR BEDROOM DIRTY LITTLE-BIT? (Is your bedroom a little bit dirty?)
12. SOUP, YOU KNOW HOW MAKE? (Do you know how to make soup?)
13. YOU NEVER EAT CANDY YOU? (You never eat candy!?)
14. NEW CAR HAVE YOU? (Do you have a new car?)
15. YOU PREFER PIZZA OR HAMBURGER? (Would you rather have pizza or a hamburger?)

Practice sheet 11.D
16. YOU LIKE MEET NEW PEOPLE YOU? (Do you like to meet new people?)
17. YOU FEEL ANXIOUS, WHEN? (When do you feel anxious?)
18. YOU LIKE CHAT-WITH DEAF? (Do you like to chat with deaf people?)
19. PEOPLE YOU LIKE WHAT-KIND?
(What type of people do you like?)
20. LEARN NEW THING YOU LIKE? (Do you like to learn new things?)

Story:
I LIKE READ. CAN'T STOP ME. ALWAYS READ, READ, ANYTHING. WATCH TV, I NEVER. SOMETIMES PEOPLE CALL-TO-ME CHAT. I PREFER READ.

History note:
In the Deaf Community during the the "old days" (before texting and internet capable mobile devices) the phrase "CAN PHONE YOU?" (or "PHONE, CAN YOU?") did not mean "Can I call you?" Rather that question typically meant: "Are you physically able to use the phone?"   Prior to the development and use of "smart phones" we (Deaf) often relied on Hearing friends and associates (or even strangers!) to make voice calls for us using "land line" phones.  Sometimes the place we were visiting (certain airports or government buildings) had a TTY (teletype, also known as TDDs or telecommunication device for the Deaf). Think of a TTY as a type of "text messaging" that required a "land line."  TTY use is now quite rare due to the use of "video phones" and text messaging.  If you'd like more info about TTY's see: "TTY".  Now that nearly everyone has "texting" capability -- access to phone usage isn't an issue any more, but before all of this "new technology" became widespread, suppose two Deaf were at a party…one of them might ask the other “CAN PHONE YOU?” The first person was typically trying to find out the level of the other person’s hearing to figure out if the other person is able to make phone calls.  An example of this might take place near the end of the party when a Deaf teenager might be looking for a way to get home and needed to call his (Hearing) parent or family member for a ride.  

Curriculum note:
Just as there are usually a variety of ways to ask the same thing in English -- there are typically multiple ways of asking the same question in ASL.  For example, the phrase "Tell me about your teacher" is good practice for (one of the versions of) the sign "
ABOUT," but there are certainly other ways to ask for information about someone.  For example, you could sign: "YOUR TEACHER LOOK-LIKE?"-(using squinted eyebrows to mean "What?"). Later on (in other lessons you will also learn:  "YOUR TEACHER, EXPLAIN HE/SHE." or "Describe your teacher."  (Or learn it now and look smart later on.)

 




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