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American Sign Language:  "meet"



The sign "MEET" uses "index finger" handshapes.  The two hands "meet" in the middle. (Make sure to scroll down and check out the me-MEET-you version.)

MEET:

MEET-you:


Note: the tips of my index fingers are not touching.  Let me show you another version that is more clear:


 

 




Note: The sign "meet" can incorporate the subject (me) and object (you) of the sentence into the sign. 

The sign "me-MEET-you" or "I  meet you"  uses the movement direction of the dominant hand to establish who is meeting whom.  Notice how the dominant hand (the right hand for right handed people) moves from me toward you.  The non-dominant hand (the left hand for right handed people) is held away from the body.  The right hand "meets" the left hand. (It is the opposite for left handed people.)  You don't need to add the signs "I" or "YOU."  This one sign includes that information already.

me-MEET-you:

 

On the other hand if you move the non-dominant hand toward you it changes the meaning to:

you-MEET-me  (you came up to me / you approached me)


Notes:
If you have time, compare MEET vs DATE/dating.  
Too often students signed something along the lines of “nice to date you” instead of "nice to meet you." There is a difference between a “D” handshape and a “1/index-finger” handshape.  You should do signs like "MEET" and “WHERE” using the 1/index-finger handshape (not a “D” handshape).


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Notes:
If you have time, compare MEET vs DATE/dating.  
Too often students signed something along the lines of “nice to date you” instead of "nice to meet you." There is a difference between a “D” handshape and a “1/index-finger” handshape.  You should do signs like "MEET" and “WHERE” using the 1/index-finger handshape (not a “D” handshape).