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Glossary / listing of ASL related terms:

[Feel free to submit a new or updated definition for any of the following terms.  This is a group project.]


AAAD see: American Athletic Association of the Deaf

ADA see: Americans with Disabilities Act

ADA: Americans With Disabilities Act. Requires that businesses and public accommodations provide reasonable access and accommodations for individuals who are disabled or are considered to have a disability.

ADARA see: American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association

Adoption:  Even if the following story isn't true, it is generally accepted as true in the Deaf community, which tells you a lot about the culture:  "A Deaf couple want to adopt a baby. They go to an adoption agency that has a department which focuses on deaf adoptions. The agency advertises in Deaf publications. The couple adopt a child and bring him home. They take him to the doctor for a check up. Eventually the doctor sits them down and asks, "Who told you this child is Deaf?" They responded that the person at the agency informed them that the foreign doctor had the birth mother stand behind the child and clap and talk to him. The child did not respond. Then the American doctor said, "Well I've got great news! I've used our equipment here and found that your child is hearing!" The Deaf adoptive couple were so upset by the news--they took the child back to the adoption agency and requested a Deaf child instead. They wanted to give the defective (hearing) child back! (For additional discussion, see: Birth of a deaf child).

ADVBA see: American Deaf Volleyball Association

AGB see: Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf

ALDA see: Association of Late Deafened Adults

Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf

American Athletic Association of the Deaf

American Deaf Volleyball Association

American Deafness and Rehabilitation Association

American Sign Language:  

"A visually perceived language based on a naturally evolved system of articulated hand gestures and their placement relative to the body, along with non-manual markers such as facial expressions, head movements, shoulder raises, mouth morphemes, etc.."  
-- William Vicars 2007

American Society for Deaf Children

American Society for Deaf Children:  They were set up in 1967. The ASDC has chapters all over the U.S. If a person comes to me who has recently given birth to a deaf child--I refer them to the ASDC as soon as possible. Seems (in my area at least) that most of the membership is made up from parents of Deaf Children.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

Americans with Disabilities Act:

ASDC see: American Society for Deaf Children

ASHA see: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

ASL see: American Sign Language

American Sign Language Teachers Association

ASL University Glossary:

ASLTA see: American Sign Language Teachers Association

Assistive technology: Do you have a "Com-Tek?" They are like a mini-radio station. You actually wear an FM receiver. It is very discreet. You put the "broadcaster" (a very small device) on the teacher, speaker, or near the speaker's microphone. It sends the sound straight to your hearing aid. Samples of assistive technology: Note: these days TTY, TDD, and TT pretty much mean the same thing. TTY = teletype CC = Closed Captioning, TDD = telecommunication device for the deaf, TT = text telephone (but that term never really caught on)

Association of Late Deafened Adults

BiBi see: Bilingual Bicultural

Bibliography:

Bilingual Bicultural

Birth of deaf child: (Celebration of): Think of it from the perspective of Deaf parents. Suppose they have a Deaf child, we'll call him Jim. He will go to a deaf school and have signing teachers then when Parent Teacher Conf comes the parents can talk directly to the teacher When Jim gets a girlfriend she will probably be deaf.  By having a Deaf child instead of a hearing one, the parents will be included when Jim gets married They will have a signed wedding the bride will have deaf friends then when they have children (grandchildren) who will probably be deaf and learn how to sign. Having a deaf child helps insure that a deaf couple will be included in the lives of their posterity! But if they have a hearing kid they can generally look on only one bright side--that he might grow up to be an interpreter for the deaf. (Celebration of): Think of it from the perspective of Deaf parents. Suppose they have a Deaf child, we'll call him Jim. He will go to a deaf school and have signing teachers then when Parent Teacher Conf comes the parents can talk directly to the teacher When Jim gets a girlfriend she will probably be deaf. By having a Deaf child instead of a hearing one, the parents will be included when Jim gets married They will have a signed wedding the bride will have deaf friends then when they have children (grandchildren) who will probably be deaf and learn how to sign. Having a deaf child helps insure that a deaf couple will be included in the lives of their posterity! But if they have a hearing kid they can generally look on only one bright side--that he might grow up to be an interpreter for the deaf.

Books:  How to pick a decent ASL dictionary: A good idea is to visit your library and lay out all the available dictionaries and compare them side by side. This will help you get a feel for a good dictionary or text.  If you happen to have a Deaf friend or two you might want to bring them along and ask their opinion. One idea is to call 1800-825-6758 (Harris Communications) and request their catalog (or get a catalog from some other fine bookstore that focuses on sign language related materials) and read through it to get a feel for what's out there.

British Sign Language

BSL see: British Sign Language

Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation

BVR see: Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation

CAAD see: Central Athletic Association of the Deaf

CAD see: Canadian Association of the Deaf

CAID see: Convention of American Instructors of the Deaf

Canadian Association of the Deaf

capitol or...call your local phone company.

Captioned Films

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

CASE see: Conceptually Accurate Signed English

CC see: Closed Captioned

CEASD see: Conference of Educational Administrators Serving the Deaf

CEC see: Council for Exceptional Children

CED see: Council on Education of the Deaf

Central Athletic Association of the Deaf

Central States Bowling Association of the Deaf

Certificate of Interpretation

Certificate of Interpretation and Transliteration

Certificate of Transliteration

Certification Maintenance Program

CF see: Captioned Films

Children of Deaf Adults

CI see: Certificate of Interpretation

CI/CT see: Certificate of Interpretation and Transliteration

Classifiers: Classifiers are signs that are used to represent general categories or "classes" of things. They can be used to describe the size and shape of an object (or person). They can be used to represent the object itself, or the way the object moves or relates to other objects (or people). Another definition is: "A set of handshapes that represent classes of things that share similar characteristics."

Clerc, Laurent:  Deaf due to an accident when he was an infant. Born south of Lyons, France, in 1785. Attended the National Institute for the Deaf in Paris. (Enrolled at age 12) Graduated eight years later and became a tutor for the Institute. Retired at age 73.

Close Captioning: Lines of text that show up on your viewing screen that correspond to what is being said, music, and the various background sounds on the program you are viewing. The close captioning signal must be decoded for it to appear on your screen. Captioning that appears without needing to be decoded is "open captioning, or open captioned."

Closed Captioned

CMP see: Certification Maintenance Program

CODA see: Children of Deaf Adults

CODA: Child of Deaf Adult

COED see: Commission on the Education of the Deaf

Commission on the Education of the Deaf

Comprehensive Skills Certificate

Conceptually Accurate Signed English

Conference of Educational Administrators Serving the Deaf

Convention of American Instructors of the Deaf

Council for Exceptional Children

Council on Education of the Deaf

CSBAD see: Central States Bowling Association of the Deaf

CSC see: Comprehensive Skills Certificate

CT see: Certificate of Transliteration

CTS see: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Cued Speech: Was developed in 1966 by R. Orin Cornett at Gallaudet University in Washington D.C. The cues consist of eight handshapes used in four different positions. You use these cues in combination with the natural mouth movements that occur during speech. The cues help individuals who are deaf to clarify sounds that might otherwise be indistinguishable on the lips.

Culture: Societies develop culture based on problems presented by their environment For example Why do people dress the way they do In hot countries they wear white because of a problem with the sun in cold countries they wear thick clothes because of a problem with the cold. Why do we eat what we do? because of problems with hunger and lack of available food.  Why do we create entertainment? Because of a problem with boredom. Different problems in the environment lead to differences in culture. So now what is Deaf people's "problem?" Take this with a grain of salt you "hearies" -- Deaf people's problem is...hearing people. Sure, sure you are right those of you who said, "communication," etc. You are “very right.” Communication is the issue, but think of it this way-- if there were no hearing people, Deaf people would all just sign to each other and no communication problem would exist. (see Pathology of Deafness)

d/Deaf:  When spelled with the small "d" the slash, and the capital "D" is used to mean physically and culturally Deaf. You can be Deaf without being deaf. For example: hearing children of Deaf parents are sometimes considered culturally Deaf.  The deaf children of hearing parents are just "physically deaf" until they start associating with the Deaf community. Is it okay to use the word Deaf?  Should we then use the term hearing impaired? Politicians used to prefer the term "hearing impaired," but the Deaf community loves the word "Deaf." You could say "Deaf" is "CC" --culturally correct. Read Deaf newspapers and you will see letters to the editor and editorials from time to time that strongly support the correctness of the term "Deaf."  I've been asked, "When you are signing to someone, do you use the sign "DEAF" instead of "HEARING IMPAIRED?"  I use the sign DEAF.

DAA see: Deaf Artists of America

DAFUS see: Deaf Athletics Federation of the United States

DB see: Deaf-blind

DBA see: Deaf Basketball Association

Deaf Artists of America

Deaf Athletics Federation of the United States

Deaf Basketball Association

Deaf Community: In regards to a culture test she recently took, Karen wrote:  <<Section 2 "Culture" [True or False] #3. "You become a member of the Deaf Community simply by losing your hearing?" My sister and her friend, both who are hoh [hard of hearing], answered true when I asked them how they'd answer that question. My reason for answering false was because it seems to me that someone has to make an effort to be involved in the community...although they're still "in" the community, aren't they? What is the reason?>>  Karen your answer "false" was correct. Let's discuss it a bit. We need to look at "acculturation.”According to my American Heritage Dictionary:  Acculturation:  "The process by which the culture of a particular society is instilled in a human being..."  A person who "loses his (or her) hearing" has not went through the acculturation process. You become a member of the Deaf Community when the culture of the Deaf Community has been instilled within you. The day after a person "loses his hearing," he still has the culture of a hearing person. He tends to be angry or depressed about the "loss." He doesn't know ASL yet. He doesn't yet subscribe to Deaf newsletters. His TV doesn't have close captioning (if it is an older model) or it is not selected. He is still a member of a hearing social club or church congregation. He doesn't have the relay number memorized. He doesn't own a TTY. Most if not all of his friends are hearing. Given a choice he would take his hearing back instantly. Even though his ears are deaf--he is still hearing in his mind. Such a person is not a member of the Deaf Community. He is a "hearing impaired" member of the Hearing World. Give enough time and opportunity he might very well become Deaf in mind and in heart as well as in his ears. He will change. He will learn ASL. He will form new friendships with Deaf people. He will tie into the community. He might even marry a Deaf lady and give birth to deaf children. Twenty or thirty years later, if handed a magic pill that "cures" deafness--he would hand it back.

Deaf President Now

Deaf Women United

deaf: deaf (with a lowercase "d")
The condition of partially or completely lacking in the sense of hearing to the extent that one cannot understand speech for everyday communication purposes. (For example, you can't hear well enough to use the phone on a consistent basis.)

Deaf: Deaf (with a capital "D") refers to embracing the cultural norms, beliefs, and values of the Deaf Community. The term "Deaf" should be capitalized when it is used as a shortened reference to being a member of the Deaf Community.
Example:  He is Deaf. (Meaning that he is a member of the Deaf Community.)
Example:  He is deaf. (Meaning that he is lacking in the sense of hearing.)

Deaf-blind

Demonstrated Signing: Signing on another person's body or on an object. 

Department of Education

Department of Health and Human Services

Department of Health, Education, and Welfare

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

DOE see: Department of Education

Dominant Hand:  The hand you do most of your signing with.

DPN see: Deaf President Now

DPRS see: Dual Party Relay Service

Dual Party Relay Service

DVR see: Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

DWU see: Deaf Women United

ED see: Department of Education

Fingerspelling

Fingerspelling: I recommend you go to the library and borrow a "Teach Yourself to Type" book. Then do the exercises just as if you were practicing typing. Actually time yourself. Then use a video camera to record your spelling. Later, watch the recording and use a tape recorder to record your voicing. Then compare the tape with the written originals.

Fonts, ASL:  There is a type font that resembles fingerspelling.  It is called Gallaudet (true type) and is available for download from the net.

FS see: Filmstrip or Fingerspelling

GA: means Go Ahead.  Used while typing on a TTY.

Gallaudet University

Gallaudet University Alumni Association

Gallaudet, Edward Minor:

Gallaudet, Thomas Hopkins: Born December 10, 1787.

Gallaudet, University:

Gestuno: International sign has been carefully developed to be non-offensive in its gestures but doesn't really qualify as a Language but rather a communication system.

GU see: Gallaudet University

GUAA see: Gallaudet University Alumni Association

Handedness:  Student asks, "Does "weak hand" and "strong hand" just refer to whether one is left or right handed?" "Weak hand" refers to your non-dominant hand and strong hand means your "dominant hand" for most people the right hand is dominant. Left-handed people sign left-hand dominant--almost a mirror image of right handed signers. Left-handed people also fingerspell with their left hand.

Hard of Hearing

HDS see: Human Development Services

Hearing People (Hearies): Non-Deaf people. Specifically hearing people who are unfamiliar with Deaf Culture, but can include all hearing people.

Hearing Impaired:    An obsolete term.  Instead use "Deaf and hard of hearing."   

Hearing of Hearing Adults:  HOHA: The hearing child of hearing parents.

Helen Keller National Center

HEW see: Department of Health, Education, and Welfare

HH see: Hard of Hearing

HHS see: Department of Health and Human Services

HI see: Hearing Impaired

HKNC see: Helen Keller National Center

HOH see: Hard of Hearing

HOHA see: Hearing of Hearing Adults

Human Development Services

IAPD see: International Association of Parents of the Deaf

 IC/TC see: Interpretation and Transliteration Certificate

 IDC see: Intertribal Deaf Council

IEP see: Individualized Education Program, Interpreter Education Program

Individualized Education Program, Interpreter Education Program

International Association of Parents of the Deaf

Internet discussion list for sign language interpreters

Interpret: means to go from Spoken English to ASL or vice versa.

Interpretation and Transliteration Certificate

Interpreter Training Program

Intertribal Deaf Council

ITP see: Interpreter Training Program

Japanese Sign Language

Jokes:  A missionary returns to the home congregation and has some deaf friends in the audience. For her homecoming talk she signs part of her message, but mangles it a bit. She had intended to sign "I really love "working" with the deaf Elders," but the Elders (she had formerly worked with) in the audience burst out laughing. She was embarrassed a bit but finished her talk. Later she approached them and asked to know why they laughed. They explained the sign she used was similar to the sign for "work" but actually meant "Make out" as in necking.

Jr.NAD see: Junior National Association of the Deaf

JSL see: Japanese Sign Language

Junior National Association of the Deaf

Kids of Deaf Adults

KODA see: Kids of Deaf Adults

Language and Culture Center

Langue des Signes Québecois

LEA see: Local Education Agency

Least Restrictive Environment

Left handed signers: Many of my left-handed friends who are deaf fingerspell with their left hand. It is perfectly acceptable for your daughter to spell with her left hand. As a left handed child learns sign language, she will tend to do a mirror image of the "normal" version of the sign. This is fine 99.9 percent of the time. The only time it is an issue is during signs that involve direction, like "RIGHT" and "LEFT." On these and similar signs you just need to make sure the sign is done in a directionally appropriate manner.

Limited Language Competency

Linguistics of Visual English

Little Theater of the Deaf

LLC see: Limited Language Competency

Local Education Agency

LOVE see: Linguistics of Visual English

LRE see: Least Restrictive Environment

LRE: Least Restrictive Environment.

LSQ see: Langue des Signes Québecois

LTD see: Little Theater of the Deaf

Manually Coded English

MCE see: Manually Coded English

MCE: Manually Coded English.

might want to call your State Office of Services for the Deaf and ask them. If that doesn't work then call your Public Service Commission. If that doesn't work then call the main number at the

Minimal Language Competency

MLC see: Minimal Language Competency

Movies involving Deaf Characters: Bridge to Silence, Love is never Silent, Children of a Lesser God.

NAD see: National Association of the Deaf

NAD: National Association for the Deaf. www.nad.org, 814 Thayer Avenue, Silver Spring, MD 20910-4500, 301-587-1788 Voice, 301-587-1789 TTY, 301-587-1791 FAX, www.nad.org

NAHSA see: National Association for Hearing and Speech Action

NAOBI see: National Association of Black Interpreters

National Association for Hearing and Speech Action

National Association of Black Interpreters

National Association of the Deaf

National Black Deaf Advocates

National Black Deaf Advocates

National Captioning Institute

National Center for Law and the Deaf

National Center on Deafness

National Congress of Jewish Deaf

National Fraternal Society of the Deaf

National Hearing Aid Society

National Hispanic Council for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing

National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf

National Softball Association of the Deaf

National Symposium on Sign Language Research and Teaching

National Technical Institute for the Deaf

National Theater of the Deaf

NBDA see: National Black Deaf Advocates

NBDA see: National Black Deaf Advocates

NCI see: National Captioning Institute

NCJD see: National Congress of Jewish Deaf

NCLD see: National Center for Law and the Deaf

NCOD see: National Center on Deafness

NERDA see: Not Even Related to a Deaf Adult

NFSD see: National Fraternal Society of the Deaf

NHAS see: National Hearing Aid Society

NHC see: National Hispanic Council for the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing

NMM: Non-manual markers:  Non-manual markers are facial expressions and body movements.  Non-manual markers are used to inflect signs.  That means to change, influence, or emphasize the meaning of a sign or signed phrase.  For example, when asking a question that can be answered with a "yes" or "no" you raise your eyebrows a bit and tilt your head forward slightly.

Not Even Related to a Deaf Adult

NRID see: National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf

NSAD see: National Softball Association of the Deaf

NSSLRT see: National Symposium on Sign Language Research and Teaching

NTD see: National Theater of the Deaf

NTID see: National Technical Institute for the Deaf

OCR see: Office of Civil Rights

ODAS see: Oral Deaf Adults Society

Of course there are levels of acceptance in any particular culture, so a hearing person might never reach the innermost circle of acceptance in the Deaf Community

Office of Civil Rights

Office of Special Education

Office of Special Education Rehabilitation Services

OIC:C see: Oral Interpreter Certificate: Comprehensive

OIC:S/V see: Oral Interpreter Certificate: Spoken to Visible

OIC:V/S see: Oral Interpreter Certificate: Visible to Spoken

Oppression:

Oral Deaf Adults Society

Oral Interpreter Certificate: Comprehensive

Oral Interpreter Certificate: Spoken to Visible

Oral Interpreter Certificate: Visible to Spoken

Oralism:

OSE see: Office of Special Education

OSERS see: Office of Special Education Rehabilitation Services

Pathology of Deafness: Pathology (in general) is the study of disease. Deaf people don't consider themselves to have a disease or problem. I took a sign class with me to visit a Deaf party. Some of my students sat with me in the Deaf circle. I decided to ask if any of them would like their hearing back suppose a magic pill could take care of it and they wake up tomorrow "hearing" they each said (via signing) NO! My students were shocked I had to explain in class the next day that Deaf people do not consider their condition pathological. To the Deaf, deafness is cultural.

PEC see: Postsecondary Education Consortium

person who has a TTY. Jessie:  How do you find out if there is a relay system? Answer:  Try looking in your phone book under "relay services." If that doesn't work, you

Pidgin Signed English

PL 94-142

Postsecondary Education Consortium

PSE see: Pidgin Signed English

PSE tends to follow English word order while using ASL signs. Initialization is kept to a minimum. Affixes are generally not used. "Be" verbs are not used. This is not to say that they are "omitted" but rather that they are expressed in ways other than a specific sign for a specific "be" verb. The sign "TRUE" is sometimes substituted for "be" verbs. Also the structure of the sentence combined with non-manual cues provides the same function as a "be" verb, (for example: nodding the head while signing "I TEACHER" would be interpreted as "I AM a teacher.") If you are taking a written test in an ASL class, watch out for questions like, "Which of the following are languages: ASL, PSE, SEE, ...etc." Chances are your instructor considers the correct answer to be "ASL" and does not include PSE, SEE, ...etc. This is because even though PSE is a "contact language," it isn't a full language in the same sense as ASL.

PSE: stands for Pidgin Signed English. Now referred to as "contact signing."  Contact signing is often used when Deaf and hearing individuals need to communicate. One way to describe it is as a "middle ground" between artificially invented signed English systems and ASL.

Public Law 94-142: Passed in 1975. The goal was to promote a free and appropriate education for all children.

Registry of Interpreter for the Deaf, Inc.

Rehabilitation Services Administration

Relay Service: A relay service allows hearing people to call deaf, and vice versa. A communication assistant (CA) answers your call then relay information back and forth between you and a deaf

Repetitive Motion Injury

Reverse Skills Certificate

RID see: Registry of Interpreter for the Deaf, Inc.

RMI see: Repetitive Motion Injury

RSA see: Rehabilitation Services Administration

RSC see: Reverse Skills Certificate

S/V see: Sign to Voice Interpreting

SC:L see: Specialist Certificate: Legal

School for the deaf:

SE: refers to Signed English (in general)  (Some people say that it is the other way around--SEE 1 refers to Signing Exact English and SEE 2 refers to Seeing Essential English) They are invented sign systems intended to represent English on the hands and thereby assist deaf children in the acquisition of English. In general SEE 1 is (was) based on syllables. The word always would be signed ALL + WAY + S. In general SEE 2 is based on a 2 out of three rule. If two words share two out of three characteristics: spelling, meaning, and/or pronunciation then you sign them the same. Also you have a number of affixes and initialized signs.

SEA see: State Education Agency

SEE 1: refers to Seeing Essential English

SEE 2: refers to Signing Exact English

SEE see: Signing Exact English/Seeing Essential English

Self-Help for Hard of Hearing:

SHHH see: Self-Help for Hard of Hearing

SIG see: Special Interest Group

Sign Instructors Guidance Network: The former name of the American Sign Language Teacher's Association.

S.I.G.N. see: Sign Instructors Guidance Network

Sign Supported English

Sign to Voice Interpreting

Signing Exact English/Seeing Essential English

SIMCOM see: Simultaneous Communication

Simcom: Signing (PSE or SE) and voicing at the same time. The term comes from the words Simultaneous Communication.

Simultaneous Communication

SK see: Stop Keying

Social Security Administration

Sociolinguistics of ASL:  ASL Sociolinguistics is the study of the way people convey identity, group membership, relationship status, and opinions of events through their use of ASL. The study of sociolinguistics in general is based on the following premises:  1. Language changes,  2. In addition to conveying information, language can be used to indicate self identity, group membership and degree of loyalty, perceptions of relationship status, and perceptions of event status.

SODA see: Spouses of Deaf Adults, Siblings of Deaf Adults

Songs:

Special Interest Group

Specialist Certificate: Legal

Spouses of Deaf Adults, Siblings of Deaf Adults

SSA see: Social Security Administration

SSDI see: Supplementary Security Disabled Income

SSE see: Sign Supported English

SSI see: Supplementary Security Income

State Education Agency

Stop Keying:  abbreviated as "SK" --used to indicate that you are going to "hang up" or terminate a text-based interaction.

Supplementary Security Disabled Income

Supplementary Security Income

TC see: Total Communication

TDD/TTY see: Telecommunication Device for the Deaf / Teletypewriter

TDD: See TTY

TDI see: Telecommunications for the Deaf, Inc.

Telecommunication Device for the Deaf / Teletypewriter

Telecommunications for the Deaf, Inc.

Telephone for All email news service

Teletypewriter

TERPS-L see: Internet discussion list for sign language interpreters

Testing:

Text typewriter

TFA see: Telephone for All email news service

The conversation generally takes place in all caps with no punctuation. If you have a question you type Q. You type GA when you mean "go ahead" and type "SK" when you are ready to "stop keying" or end the call. For example if I were having a conversation on a TTY and I typed GA it would mean it is your turn to talk if I typed GA to SK, it would mean I'm ready to quit. If you typed back SK SK (double SK), it would mean you are done. Then we would both hang up.

Time, length of to become proficient: (Student asks) How long does it take to become proficient in sign? (Response) It depends how smart you are and what opportunities you have. I require about 360 classroom contact hours in my general program. That gets you up to conversational fluency--but I have students who can muck their way through a painfully slow signed conversation regarding a really basic topic after just a six-week class. I'm not saying such a conversation involves much language, but rather "communication" and/or negotiation of meaning. A lot depends on the deaf person you are communicating with. If he or she understands English word order. To actually become "good" at ASL (not PSE/contact signing, nor Signed English) you need about 480 classroom contact hours and about 1200 hours out of class practice.

Total Communication

Transliterate: (in this field): to go from spoken English to Signed English or vice versa.

TT see: Text typewriter

TTY see: Teletypewriter

TTY: A TTY (or a TDD) is a teletype or a telecommunication device for the Deaf. The phone rings. In a Deaf household it is generally attached to a lamp. The lamp goes on and off with the ringing of the phone. The Deaf person picks up the handset and places it on a coupling that attaches it to the TTY. Then the Deaf person types, "JOHN HERE GA" then John (or whoever) waits for a response. If words start coming across the screen, he knows that this is a TDD call. If jumbled letters come accross the screen it is probably a call from a hearing person without a TTY.

TY: shorthand during online chats for "thank you." TY is used in chat rooms and occasionally by Deaf people in signed conversations as sort of a "cute" way to say "thank you."

United States Deaf Bowling Federation

United States Deaf Skiers Association

United States Deaf Soccer Association

United States Deaf Tennis Association

USDBF see: United States Deaf Bowling Federation

USDSA see: United States Deaf Skiers Association

USDSO see: United States Deaf Soccer Association

USDTA see: United States Deaf Tennis Association

VESID see: Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities

Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities

Vocational Rehabilitation

Voicing: One place you will often see Deaf people using voice is with their kids. Let's face it--in the home parents sometimes need to get their kids attention and making a little noise through voicing is the easiest way to do it. Also the children get used to the voice and can understand it just fine. On the other extreme, the LEAST likely time for a Deaf person to voice is with a hearing stranger. With their kids they feel comfortable, but with strangers they feel very cautious (as any oppressed group would). They don't tend to voice when they are talking with another Deaf person. Why voice to other deaf? Another reason is you can't use voicing and ASL grammar at the same time. (See Simcom)

VR see: Vocational Rehabilitation

WCJD see: World Congress of Jewish Deaf

WDT see: World Deaf Timber Festival

Western Region Outreach Center and Consortia

WFD see: World Federation of the Deaf

WGD see: World Games for the Deaf

World Congress of Jewish Deaf

World Deaf Timber Festival

World Federation of the Deaf

World Games for the Deaf

World Recreation Association of the Deaf

World Winter Games for the Deaf

WRAD see: World Recreation Association of the Deaf

WROCC see: Western Region Outreach Center and Consortia

WWGD see: World Winter Games for the Deaf

YLC see: Youth Leadership Camp

Youth Leadership Camp

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