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American Sign Language: "Nursing Home"


The concept of "Nursing Home" can be expressed in a couple of different ways.

Some Deaf people are more "bilingual" than others and have adopted the English word "nurse" and compounded it with "home" to mean "nursing home."

Some "ASL" instructors will tell you to spell "nursing" then sign "HOME."   I suppose that is a "safe" answer.
If the person with whom you are signing doesn't understand what it means, sure, you can explain that it means:  "HOME FOR OLD PEOPLE."  Remember though, that is an explanation not a "suggested sign." 

I'm going to go ahead and suggest that you sign NURSE-HOME but I'll caution you that not everyone will agree with that sign. 
Another option (see below) is to sign SENIOR-CITIZEN-HOME -- which I think is a decent choice.
Also TAKE-CARE-HOME (compound sign with reduced movements) seems to work very well (see below).
- Dr. Bill
 


In a message dated 1/28/2014 9:00:18 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, Kara Kruger writes:

I love your site and recommend it to a lot of people. I work as a case manager to deaf senior citizens and as they age, many are needing to move to group homes and nursing homes where staff does not know sign language. I would love to see a section like “First 100 signs” for this type of situation. The most important things would be activity signs for basic senior games, feelings, pain, injury signs, mealtime signs, medical basics, some basic safety signs like fire drill.
Just an idea for a great page that would be very helpful in my every day work!
Thanks.
- Kara Kruger
Family Care Case Manager
 


 

In a message dated 1/18/2017 7:32:14 A.M. Pacific Standard Time, Lyn writes:
 

I like your discussion of the various signs for nursing home.  In this area and in Seattle I occasionally see:  senior-citizens, home (senior citizens as sign with an S at dominant corner of the mouth and then moving hand to the non-dominant corner of the mouth and signing C).
A certified interpreter in Seattle told me that she was taught that 'senior-citizens home' is less harsh (her words) and more respectful than 'old persons' home.'  In her words, "Just like when we speak by voice, referring to someone as a 'senior citizen' is more respectful than calling them an  'old person.'
As for me, I'm an 'old-person-senior-citizen' so either of those terms/signs are okay with me :) 
Is the sign 'senior-citizen, home' acceptable for 'nursing home' as well - or not?  Your thoughts?

- Lyn

--------------------
Dear Lyn,
I think that "SENIOR-CITIZENS HOME" version is really neat.
I also sort of like the idea of a "TAKE-CARE HOME" -- using the sign that looks like KEEP.  Typically I do the sign TAKE-CARE-of using a double movement but I find myself tending to using a single contact of the K-hands followed by a single contact of the HOME sign. (Thus it is expressed as a compound.) 
-- Bill
--------------------


In a message dated 1/18/2017 3:04:21 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, Lyn  writes:

I LIKE your suggestion: take-care-of, home. I think it is respectful and suitable - - because many people in nursing homes are relatively or quite young and in the facilities because they require special health care. I had a cousin who, in a drunken stupor at a party, dove into an empty swimming pool (he was 32 years old) and was paralyzed from the neck down. He was in a nursing home from his thirties until he passed away in his 60s.
So 'take-care-of, home' appeals to me. Thank you for that suggestion.

--------------------
Lyn,
GOOD point! (About the fact that nursing homes are not just for "old" people.) I think I'm going to bump up the TAKE-CARE-HOME (compound sign with reduced movements) as a suggested version.  "NURSE-HOME" is still prevalent so it needs to stay on the page but it is good to provide other options.
Also, I'm sure there are a lot of "nurses" who would take offense at the idea that the word "nursing" is "harsh."

 



Nursing Home Signs:

Games/Activities:  BINGO / CARDS / EXERCISE / DEAF CLUB
People:  FAMILY / SON / DAUGHTER / GUARDIAN / SOCIAL WORKER
Feelings:  FINE GOOD OKAY glad-HAPPY LONELY / CONFUSED / ANGRY
Social:  MEET / WELCOME / GOOD-MORNING-AFTERNOON-NIGHT / VISIT / BIRTHDAY / TRANSPORTATION / LATE / CANCELED / WAIT
Safety: FIRE-DRILL / TORNADO-DRILL / EMERGENCY-TESTING
Medical: PAIN-INJURY / BANDAGE / CHANGE / take-PILL / NURSE / DOCTOR / SICK / INJECTION / MEDICINE / FALL-down
Mealtime: EAT / DRINK / DON’T LIKE / HOT / COLD
Hygiene: BATHROOM / SHOWER / BATH /

Equipment:  WHEELCHAIR / WALKER / GLASSES / HEARING-AID
 


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